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Phone Scam Alert! Credit Card Security Information

by US Equestrian Communications Department | Oct 4, 2019, 3:00 PM EST

Dear US Equestrian Members,

As a followup to our communication in the September 24 Equestrian Weekly newsletter, please be aware that US Equestrian has continued to receive reports of a phone scam where unknown individuals are contacting exhibitors and members, posing as show representatives or feed/bedding suppliers, and requesting credit card information over the phone for feed/bedding orders, which has led to fraudulent charges.

In an effort to protect our members and spread awareness about this scam and others of the like, as these types of phone scams are more common and harder to detect than one may think, we are sharing a few credit card security dos and don’ts.

Credit Card Security Dos and Don’ts:

  • Do use a credit card – credit cards have better fraud protection than debit cards.
  • Do monitor your account regularly and check for new charges often.
  • Do report suspected fraud right away. Your credit card issuer can block your card and account number so no one else can use them, then give you a new card and account number.
  • Don’t give your card information over the phone unless you initiated the call and you’re talking to a bank or merchant you trust.
  • Don’t answer an email that asks for your account number or personal information, even if it looks like it’s from your bank or a reputable company or organization.
  • Don’t share your card number where others can hear.

 

Please know that US Equestrian, like USHJA, will:

  • Never solicit you for funds related to another individual member or company. As a 501(c)3, we are not permitted to collect funds on behalf of an individual, member, or company.
  • Never ask you to provide credit card or Social Security numbers via email.

 

According to the Federal Trade Commission, “Every year, thousands of people lose money to telephone scams—from a few dollars to their life savings. Scammers will say anything to cheat people out of money. Some seem very friendly—calling you by your first name, making small talk, and asking about your family. They may claim to work for a company you trust, or they may send mail or place ads to convince you to call them.

“If you get a call from someone you don’t know who is trying to sell you something you hadn’t planned to buy, say ‘No thanks.’ And, if they pressure you about giving up personal information—like your credit card or Social Security number—it’s likely a scam. Hang up and report it to the Federal Trade Commission.”

For more information about phone scams, the signs of a scam, why someone may call you and how to handle unexpected sales calls, click here.

Safeguarding the information you entrust to us is an important part of what we do at US Equestrian. Thank you for your membership, and we look forward to continuing to serve you.