• USEF Network The winner of the $100,000 CSI 3* Grand Prix presented by Split Rock Farm, Inc.​ is Kevin Babington with Shorapur! #SRJT15 5/24/2015 4:43:20 PM
  • USEF Network Margie Engle and Royce jump clear with a 40.14 time. #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:39:17 PM
  • USEF Network Meagan Nusz and Sri Aladdin jump clear in 43.59 seconds #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:37:08 PM
  • USEF Network Kevin Babington and Shorapur have a clear round and a time of 39.25 to take the lead. #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:33:56 PM
  • USEF Network Ali Wolff and Brianda finish on eight jumping faults and a time of 44.30 #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:31:55 PM
  • USEF Network David Beisel and Call Me Hannes have four jumping faults in 44.32 seconds. #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:30:07 PM
  • USEF Network Andres Rodriguez and Darlon Von Groenhove have a clear round with a time of 40.70. #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:26:45 PM
  • USEF Network Charlie Jayne and Valeska finishes with four jumping faults in 41.37 seconds. 5/24/2015 4:24:34 PM
  • USEF Network Meagan Nusz and Leoville 2 has a clear jump-off with a time of 46.99. 5/24/2015 4:22:40 PM
  • USEF Network Kaitlin Campbell and Rocky W jump clear in 40.69 seconds #SRJT2015 5/24/2015 4:20:39 PM

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Endurance

As its name implies, the discipline of endurance tests a horse’s fitness and stamina, and a rider’s horsemanship skills, in a long-distance competitive format where the condition of the horse is paramount. Recognized endurance competitions can be 50-, 75- or 100-miles long, and all are held in[...] a 24-hour period. Courses are cross-country and can include natural obstacles such as ditches, creeks, and thickly forested hillsides. Strict controls and rules are in place to ensure the safety and wellbeing of competing horses. Competitions can be divided by weight divisions (rider plus tack) to ensure a level playing field, and veterinary check-points are placed at various locations throughout a course to ensure that the horses are sound and fit enough to continue to the next stage.

Since the primary objective of an endurance ride is its completion, all competitors crossing the finish line are awarded. Additional ranked placings are earned by the horse and rider teams finishing the course in the best times, and there are usually awards given to the best conditioned horses. Endurance rides are held all over the United States and in exotic locales all across the world. The discipline gained international recognition by the Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) in 1978, and the first World Championship event was held in 1986.

Rather than celebrating its heritage by simply looking into the past, endurance riding in the United States routinely revisits its history with many of its competitions taking place on historic trails, such as the Pony Express Trail, the Outlaw Trail, the Chief Joseph Trail, and the Lewis and Clark Trail. In addition to providing a challenging athletic endeavor for both recreational riders and those with international competitive aspirations, endurance rides promote the importance of open-space preservation for future generations and a continuing appreciation for our American heritage.

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American Endurance Ride Conference

USEF International Discipline Association

The AERC was founded as a national governing body for long distance riding and over the years has developed a set of rules and guidelines designed to provide a standardized format and strict veterinary controls. In addition to promoting the sport of endurance riding, the AERC encourages the use, protection, and development of equestrian trails, especially those with historic significance.
aerc.org

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF)?

    USEF is the National Governing Body for Equestrian Sport and is the National Federation for International Competition. Since 1971, it has been the only national organization dedicated to the promotion of equestrian sport, fair competition, and equine welfare regardless of breed or discipline.

  • What is the FEI?

    Located in Lausanne, Switzerland, the FEI (Fédération Equestre Internationale) was founded in 1921. It is the governing body for all international events in Olympic and Non-Olympic disciplines. The FEI establishes the regulations for international competition and approves equestrian programs at Championships, Continental and Regional Games as well as the Olympic & Paralympic Games.

  • How do I qualify for my first FEI 1* competition?

    You, as the athlete, must complete the novice qualification established by the FEI. The novice qualifications require the athlete to successfully complete 2 rides between 25miles and 49miles AND 2 rides between 50miles and 56miles. Each ride must be at a speed of 10mph or under and are not required to be done in any certain order. Your novice qualifications must be completed at AERC competitions and USEF Staff must be able to verify your competition record through the AERC website.

    Athletes must complete the novice eligibility requirements all within the 24 month period and no shorter than 6 months, immediately prior to taking part in an FEI competition.

  • How do I qualify my horse for its first FEI competition?

    Your horse must be at least 5 years old to qualify as novice and complete the novice qualifications established by the FEI. The novice qualifications require a horse to successfully complete 2 rides between 25miles and 49miles AND 2 rides between 50miles and 56miles. Each ride must be at a speed of 10mph or under and are not required to be done in any certain order. These rides must be completed at AERC competitions and USEF Staff must be able to verify your horse’s competition record through the AERC website.

    Horses must complete the requirements of this qualifying phase all within the 24 month period and no shorter than 12 months, immediately prior to taking part in an FEI Competition.

  • Does my horse need an FEI Passport?

    Your horse does not need an FEI Passport unless it is going to be competed at a 3* competition, outside of the U.S., or at an FEI Championship (i.e., NAJYRC).

  • What is a Young Rider? What is a Senior Rider?

    Young Rider is a category of athletes who may take part in FEI Competitions for Young Riders from the beginning of the year they reach the age of fourteen (14) until the end of the year they reach the age of twenty one (21). A Young Rider event is listed as CEIYJ.

    Athletes may take part in FEI Senior Competitions and Championships from the beginning of the year they reach the age of (eighteen) 18. If an athlete is between the ages of 18 and 21, he/she may take part in a Senior competition if he/she meets the minimum weight of 75kg. A Senior event is listed as CEI.

  • What are the distances in an FEI competition?

    FEI endurance competitions are divided into four (4) different star levels:

    1. 1. 80km to 119km in one day
    2. 2. 120km to 139km in one day
      Or between 70km and 89km per day over two (2) days
    3. 3. 140km to 160km in one day
      Or 90-100km per day over two (2) days
      Or 70-80km per day over three (3) days
    4. 4. Senior Championship
      Minimum of 160km in one day
    5. 4. Junior and Young Rider Championships
      Between 120km and 130km in one day
  • How do I declare my intent to the FEI?
    • Log into the athlete’s USEF account here
    • Scroll down and click on “FEI Competition Information & Competing Abroad”
    • Click on the Endurance Icon
    • Select the competition you wish to declare your intent
    • Select the star category/distance/date you will be competing in at the competition.
    • Complete the Trainer Information
    • Scroll down the page to select your horse. Search for the horse by name or FEI Registration number. Click on “Search Horse.” Select the correct horse.
    • Select “Submit For Confirmation Email”

    Please email Kristen Brett with any questions about the FEI Entry System.

  • How do I enter a competition held outside of the U.S.?

    When you enter a competition held outside of the U.S., you are required to submit the online Compete Abroad Application. USEF will submit your entry to the Organizing Committee for you.

    • Sign into your USEF Account here
    • Scroll down and click on “FEI Competition Information & Competing Abroad”
    • Click “Online Application to Compete Abroad”
    • Follow Application Instructions.

    Please email questions regarding this application to Courtney Barnett

  • What are Mandatory Rest Periods?

    After competing in an FEI competition, a horse must be given a mandatory minimum rest period before it is again eligible to participate in a National or FEI Competition. The rest period commences at Midnight on the day that the ride finishes as denoted by the maximum ride time allowed and finishes at Midnight, the day before published ride start time:

    Distance Completed start – 40km 5 days (retirement only)
    start – 80km 12 days
    Over 80 - 120km 19 days
    Over 120 - 140km 26 days
    Over 140km 33 days

    Please review the FEI rules for extended mandatory rest periods following immediate invasive treatment. FEI Endurance Rule Book

  • How do I find the FEI Rules?

    The FEI Endurance Rule Book, Veterinary Rules and the General Regulations are found on the FEI website here. If you have any questions about the rules, please submit your question(s) via email to Kristen Brett.

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Staff Contact

Endurance questions? You can email or call Kristen Brett, Sport Programs Assistant, Endurance. You can also go to the Staff Directory for a more detailed list of numbers.

kbrett@usef.org
859 225 6919

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