• USEF Network Reminder, if you missed last weekend's @platinumperf /USEF Talent Search Finals East, all the phases are on demand: http://t.co/rWn0vVDgFb 10/8/2015 4:27:26 PM
  • USEF Network .@Noelle_Floyd You are correct, our bad! 10/8/2015 1:43:18 PM
  • USEF Network We will have the @nsbits /USEF Junior Jumping Championship and Pessoa/USEF Medal Final available to watch on-demand early next week 10/7/2015 5:04:58 PM
  • USEF Network @cnnsport chatted with Laura Sumrall about her winning freestyle reining performance to Frozen's 'Let it Go': http://t.co/2HQGd21Zw0 10/6/2015 4:10:05 PM
  • USEF Network .@PicChick1 The top 10 results were just live streamed. Top 4 in order: Tori, McKayla, Hunter, TJ. Will post complete results ASAP 10/4/2015 2:42:38 PM
  • USEF Network .@PicChick1 We streamed all the way through the awards. If you missed it we will have it all available on demand early next week. 10/4/2015 2:41:16 PM
  • USEF Network We have posted the 4 rides from the final round of the ride-off on our Facebook page for anyone that missed it: https://t.co/vW5x7JMsgd 10/4/2015 2:36:30 PM
  • USEF Network Leading Trainer: Andre Dignelli 10/4/2015 2:32:42 PM
  • USEF Network Grapa Trophy (Best Horse) winner: Skyfall owned by Linda Langmeier 10/4/2015 2:31:23 PM
  • USEF Network Talent Search Finals East 2015 Champion: Tori Colvin riding Avalanche 10/4/2015 2:24:43 PM

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Parade Horse

While the actual concept of celebratory parades involving horses and carried out to acknowledge battle victories is centuries old, the first purely ceremonial and regularly scheduled parade can be traced back to 1745 with the beginning of the British Monarchy’s Horse Guard Parade, performed daily by the Palace Guard. This well-known ceremony has prevailed and remains extremely popular to this day. The modern show ring parade horse’s roots, however, take on a Western theme and can be traced back to the mid-1800s when wealthy landowners in the Southwest region of the United States— particularly near the Mexican border— spared no luxury with their saddle horse transportation. These proud ranch and hacienda owners saddled their superbly trained and stylish mounts with beautifully hand-crafted saddles and bridles trimmed in the finest silver, and traveled to town in high-stepping style. It is no surprise that horse show enthusiasts wanted to celebrate this colorful and rich history by developing a discipline dedicated to the unique heritage of these special horses.

The modern show ring parade horse can be of any breed, although the refined, animated carriage associated with Saddlebreds, Morgans, and Hackneys make them favorite choices. A typical turn-out for a parade horse includes elaborate forms of Western tack including a bridle, breast-collar, and stock saddle adorned heavily with silver. The rider is most commonly attired in brightly-colored, elaborately decorated Western wear typical of the Old West which can be American, Mexican or Spanish in origin. A winning parade horse must have impeccable manners, and since beauty is important, blemishes are also considered. The parade mount is shown at two gaits: the animated walk and the “parade gait,” —a true, straight, square, high-prancing, balanced, and collected trot, the maximum speed of which should not exceed five miles-per-hour. To learn more about the dynamic, exciting discipline of parade, visit the United States Equestrian Federation at usef.org.